A Handful of Heroic CPR Stories

Every day in the United States and around the world, there are many victims of cardiac arrest, shock and other emergencies that require CPR. Unfortunately, not every instance is lucky enough to have somebody nearby with CPR training.

But amazing CPR situations happen on a daily basis. Here are 5 recent stories that show how preparation, calmness under fire and a willingness to help results in saved lives.

A Handful of Heroic CPR Stories

A Handful of Heroic CPR Stories

  • In South Brunswick, NJ, a 61-year old man was saved by his wife and police officers. Robert Woods had trouble breathing, so his wife called 911. She immediately started chest compressions. Shortly after, police officers arrived with a first aid bag, oxygen and a portable defibrillator. Thanks to the quick & decisive action, Woods continues to recover at home.
  • A Missouri teen used quick-thinking CPR skills to save a baby at a Walmart store. Abby Snodgrass heard a situation developing aisles away and rushed to help. She found an 11-month old baby that had stopped breathing. Snodgrass, who had recently taken a CPR course at her high school health class, fearlessly performed CPR, despite doubts about the effort. “The one thought that crossed my mind was, ‘What if this doesn’t work?’ And I just had to push it out of my mind and keep going because I knew that’s what I had to do,” Snodgrass said. The baby is now home, happier & healthier than ever.
  • An alert Oregonian helped save the life of a woman involved in a car crash on I-84. Ray Hasbell, who is certified in CPR, saw a crashed car in the westbound lane of I-84. He called 911, then pulled next to the wreck. One woman had collapsed after a fiery explosion. Two other bystanders carried the woman off the road and asked Hasbell if he knew CPR. The woman is now doing fine. Hasbell’s takeaway from his life-saving exploits? “You never think you’ll use CPR,” he said. “But in the heat of the moment it comes in handy.”
  • Yes, even man’s best friends can be saved by CPR. A recent trailer fire in Pueblo nearly took the life of two dogs, but emergency responders were able to save the day. After a tense SWAT standoff, police used a flash-bang device to disable the suspect. Once authorities went inside, they found three dogs inside – and none were breathing. Pueblo Fire members performed CPR and oxygen administration. Two dogs survived.
  • A Rochester, NY-area teenager was recently saved in school with CPR. A Greece Central student collapsed in gym class but received CPR and is now doing OK. School officials credit recent policy changes. All New York high schools are now required to have CPR training in case of emergencies. Greece Central School District has implemented the Heart Safe School Accreditation, which aims to train 6,000 students in hands-only CPR. Here’s a case of “legislated heroism.”

Stories like these only happen if people are properly trained in CPR. If you’d like to receive training from SureFire CPR, just call (888) 277-3143 to speak with our CPR specialists. You can also visit our contact page.

 

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SureFire CPR Made Top Workplaces 2014

Surefire CPR Orange County Register Top Workplace 2014

“A company is only as good as its employees.” SureFire CPR is proud to have a dedicated and professional staff. Our workers comprise an accomplished group from varied fields and endeavors, including firefighters, EMT technicians, lifeguards, nurses, healthcare professionals and more.

Over the years, we’ve rewarded our staff with plenty of on-the-job perks and have also fostered an environment that is attentive to employee needs.

 

SureFire CPR has always been regarded as a great place to work, and this sentiment has just been recognized by the OC Register.

 

In that publication’s recent list of Orange County’s Top Workplaces of 2014, SureFire CPR came in second place for the Small Business category. This prestigious honor is the result of our proactive, employee-centered culture.

 

Considering Orange County’s vibrant corporate business setting, a #2 ranking is no small feat – and it’s something we’re immensely proud of. But most of all, we’re grateful for our employees, and appreciative that SureFire CPR trainers, administrators and other personnel have put our company on the “Best Workplaces” map.

 

The OC Register’s rankings were divided up into 3 categories (Large, Midsize and Small) and included companies like Vans, First
American Financial Corp., Zillow, Inc., Zumasys, Inc. and QuestSoft.

 

In the Small Business category, SureFire CPR came in just behind Pacific Hospitalist Associates and ahead of Mattson Resources.

 

If you’re interested in learning more about our company, or would like to explore career opportunities with SureFire CPR, please call (888) 277-3143, or visit the SureFire CPR contact page. We’re always looking for experienced staff to join our ranks.

 

Thanks for checking out our blog. And to our world-class employees, thanks again for recognizing SureFire CPR as one of Orange County’s Top Workplaces 2014!

 

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Is Hands-Only CPR Effective?

Is Hands-Only CPR Effective?

Is Hands-Only CPR Effective?

One debate that never seems to go away with CPR is the hands-only method. Some medical professionals think CPR with breathing works better, while others prefer the hands-only option. Both can certainly help, but the big question remains: is hands-only CPR a legitimate method in the event of an emergency?

 

Obviously, CPR with artificial respiration is preferable for victims of cardiac arrest. The combination of chest compressions and rescue breaths has been shown to give patients a better chance of survival.

 

Unless someone is properly trained in CPR with airway management, the next-best option is hands-only CPR. And according to the American Heart Association (AHA), it can mean the difference between life and death.

 

Hands-only CPR keeps the victim’s heart and respiratory systems functioning until professional medical help arrive on the scene. What makes the practice effective is that practically anyone can do it (although proper training is certainly recommended).

 

Even without artificial respiration, the important thing to remember is this: hands-free CPR is still a preferable alternative to no action at all. Hands-free CPR can double a victim’s chance of survival.

 

The bottom line: CPR even without rescue breathing is effective. Read More »

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What Healthcare Certification Do you Need?

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Receiving a healthcare certification is a necessity for most healthcare professionals and a fast-growing area that offers abundant job options to choose from, each with its own particular qualifications. Figuring out which professions require certain training can be confusing, but we’re here to clear up some common misconceptions. Let’s look at ten common healthcare training courses. After a brief explanation of each, you can see which jobs require each course. Keep in mind, training standards and requirements vary state by state, although national recommendations are often used as guidelines.

First Aid – this basic training covers trauma, falls seizures, patient assessments and other emergency response tactics. Professions that use First Aid: nursing assistants, construction crew leaders, child care providers, adult family home aids, logging crew, rescue dive teams

CPR and AED (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) – used to treat cardiac arrest victims until help arrives. CPR is usually a combination of chest compressions and rescue breaths.  The AED (Automated External Defibrillator) is the machine used to “shock” the heart into a normal rhythm. People that use CPR: parents, security guards, teachers, fitness trainers, flight attendants, and laypeople.

ACLS (Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support) – the set of interventions for urgent treatment of cardiac arrest, stroke, and other life-threatening medical emergencies. ACLS includes advanced airway management, pharmacological interventions, and resuscitation team management. Professions that use ACLS: all healthcare professionals and medical personnel who may respond to a cardiovascular emergency.

BLS (Basic Life Support) – BLS is CPR for Healthcare Providers. This class covers CPR, AED, choking for conscious and unconscious patients of all ages and 2 rescuer CPR. Professions that use BLS: doctors, nurses, firefighters, police officers, dentists, EMT technicians, healthcare professionals, and other medical workers.

**Tip: If you are not sure if you need CPR and AED or BLS, take the BLS course. BLS is the highest level of CPR training and will fulfill any job requirement for CPR training.

PALS (Pediatric Advanced Life Support) – Essential for healthcare providers who respond to emergencies in infants and children. Professions that use PALS: doctors, nurses, dentists, pediatric healthcare workers

Pediatric First Aid and CPR Class- Helps manage illnesses and injuries in a child or infant in the first few minutes until professional help arrives. It is designed for non-healthcare individuals and child care workers. Professions that Use Pediatric First Aid: parents, preschool teachers, daycare workers, nannies, babysitters **Tip: Our Pediatric First Aid and CPR class is approved through the California EMSA

NRP (Neonatal Resuscitation Program) – this program is for physicians and nurses that work in the neonatal ICU or labor and delivery department Professions that use NRP: doctors, pediatric healthcare workers, nurses

ECG and Pharmacology (Electrocardiography) – this specialized process is helpful for anyone suffering a heart attack, cardiac murmurs, seizures, pulmonary embolism and other life-threatening emergencies. ECG and Pharmacology is designed to prepare students for ACLS and PALS training. Professions that use ECG: licensed healthcare professionals – doctors, nurses, hospital assistants and aids, ECG technicians

Hospital Fire Safety – this program covers fire extinguisher use, patient rescue scenarios, fire alarm systems, and pre fire planning. This course is specifically designed for Los Angeles City hospitals. Professions that use Hospital Fire Safety: any employee that works in acute care hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, or psychiatric hospitals in Los Angeles.

PEARS (Pediatric Emergency Assessment, Recognition, and Stabilization)– this program covers the steps needed to recognize and manage pediatric emergencies. If you are credentialed for advanced pediatric skills, please take the PALS course. Professions that use PEARS: healthcare employees and administrative personnel that work in facilities caring for children.

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“Medical Creep” – How CPR Gained Popularity and Prominence Since 1960

Medical CreepHow did cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) become the most popular way to treat cardiac arrest victims? It wasn’t official medical doctrine forced upon the public. It wasn’t random chance, either. No, CPR became a well-known medical practice due to something called “medical creep.”

 

According to a recent article by Brendan Reilly in The Atlantic, CPR got its start back in 1960, when surgeons at Johns Hopkins started a practice called “closed-chest cardiac massage.” Before this, doctors had to actually open a patient’s chest cavity and massage the heart. Aside from the obvious infection risks this posed, it also was time-consuming enough that, many times, it would be too late to save the person suffering from cardiac arrest.

 

The “medical creep” happened when the Johns Hopkins doctors and medical professionals started the closed-chest cardiac massage. Despite no evidence that the practical actually worked, the initial results were impressive enough to continue it – even though the so-called medical “experts” were skeptical (to say the least). This was CPR’s foot in the door, so to speak. Years of refining the procedure and tons of research did the rest.

 

Because the new method gained a foothold, it was only a matter of time before this effective, relatively easy-to-follow procedure found its way into mainstream medical practice. Even though the efficacy (results of CPR in ideal conditions) didn’t equate with the effectiveness (results of CPR in real-world conditions), CPR was well on its way to becoming widely-used throughout the United States and the world.

 

Medical creep, according to Reilly, has its pros and cons. But in the case of CPR, the creep has overall beneficial – after all, the end result was a practice that normal citizens (not just healthcare workers, nurses, doctors and the like) can use with effective training.

 

If you’d like to get the best possible CPR training, SureFire CPR is the #1 choice for Southern California and the greater Los Angeles area. Our CPR, BLS, ACLS, PALS and other courses are taught by medical professionals who are experts in their respective fields.

 

Contact us today! To speak with a CPR expert, please call (888) 277-3143, or visit our contact page. We’d love to hear from you.

Thanks again for reading the SureFire CPR blog.

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BLS Training: Common Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

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Basic Life Support (BLS) training is often used in tandem with CPR training. These crucial life-saving practices and procedures are important for anyone involved with emergency response situations – EMT technicians, lifeguards, firefighters, police officers and many more.

Since BLS training isn’t as well-known as CPR training, some people often make a few mistakes. These can occur both before and during the training. But don’t worry – they’re easily fixed. Let’s look at these slipups, and what can be done to remedy the situation.

Mistake #1 – Registering for an Incorrect Class

This happens more often than you think. Many people sign up for CPR training instead of a BLS class. Because there are common misconceptions between the two, you should be aware that BLS includes CPR, and also reviews other important practices. For example, the basic SureFire CPR BLS class touches on adult, child, and infant CPR, conscious and unconscious choking for victims of all ages, Automated External Defibrillator (AED) training and more. If you’re unsure about which class you need, just check with your supervisor beforehand.

Mistake #2 – Inadequate Compressing

During BLS training, not compressing correctly is often cited as a problem. The compression process requires enough force and also correct frequency. And since BLS training includes child and infant CPR, this is especially true with non-adults. Remember, children and infants require enough compression to kick-start the victim’s circulatory and respiratory systems. Similar to the first mistake, this one is solved by checking with the instructor to ensure you’re doing it correctly.

Did you know that SureFire CPR can help with both of these common mistakes? Our training experts can help you sign up for the right training. And once your BLS class begins, your professional & courteous SureFire CPR instructor will help with any issues along the way – yes, including proper compression for children & infants!

As Southern California’s premier CPR training company, we’ve helped hospitals, emergency response units, government agencies and private organizations with their CPR, BLS, ACLS and other training requirements. We can help today – just call our team at (888) 277-3143, or visit our contact page for more valuable information.

Thanks for stopping by!

 

 

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Free Hands-Only CPR Classes at the Orange County Health and Wellness Fair

SureFire CPR, the leading provider of CPR training in Orange County, hosted free Hands-Only CPR classes at the Orange County Health and Wellness Fair on Saturday August 23, 2014 from 9am to 3:30pm. The life-saving CPR classes were offered every hour on the stage throughout the day.
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CPR for Students is Required in NJ; Coming to California, Too?

CPR for Students is Required in NJ; Coming to California, Too?

CPR for Students is Required in NJ; Coming to California, Too?

With the emphasis on school safety stronger than ever, New Jersey is taking a bold approach. Starting this school year, all New Jersey high school students will be required to have CPR training.

The initiative has gained momentum throughout the last decade, and legislators finally thought the time was right to act. Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno signed a law recently, which requires all high school students (in New Jersey, defined as 9th through 12th grade) to acquire CPR training.
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Essential Safety Items to Pack When Going Camping

Camping is one of the most popular American outdoor activities. From pitching a tent in the backyard to extensive trips to national parks, it’s an excellent way to have fun and create memories. And to make sure those memories are fond ones, you’ll want to be prepared as you head into the Great Outdoors.

These essential safety items should be in everybody’s backpack.
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What To Do If You Get Bitten By A Snake

With summer in full swing, many of us are out enjoying the great outdoors. But all kinds of things live outside our homes, including a few really unpleasant creatures.

This blog will focus on what to do in the event you’re bitten by a snake. The United States generally doesn’t have the types of famous venomous snakes that inhabit Africa, Asia and the Indian subcontinent, however here in Southern California there are a few nasty species to keep your eye out for. Some of these bad guys include sidewinders, and a few different species of rattlesnakes, including western rattlesnakes, and the mojave rattlesnake.

What to do if you get Bitten by a Snake

What to do if you get Bitten by a Snake

To avoid getting bitten by a snake, it’s best to keep away from brush and other concealed areas (areas under sheds and porches). If you disturb a snake’s home, they’ll defend their territory – some ferociously.

If you are bitten by a snake, here are some general rules to follow:

• Move away from the snake. Repeat bites are common in encounters where the victim doesn’t leave the area.
• Try to identify what kind of snake bit you. Failing a picture, try to get a mental image. This information will be helpful at the hospital.
• Keep the affected body part still. Unnecessary movement can spread venom and further irritate the injury.
• Even if you see no swelling or discoloration, get to a health clinic or hospital immediately.
• Do not try to suck the venom from your wound. If the snake is venomous, this just puts the poison into your mouth, throat and lungs. Bad idea – keep the venom as isolated as possible.
• Remove any jewelry. More than 50% of snakebites are to the hands. Remove bracelets, rings, watches and anything else.

And just like any other emergency, it helps to stay as calm as you can. The situation can become much worse by panicking.

According to the California Poison Control Center, rattlesnakes account for more than 800 bites each year in California, with most bites occurring between April and October when both humans and snakes are most active outside.

With our informative Southern California CPR training classes, as well as BLS classes, ACLS classes and other emergency training, SureFire CPR can help keep you prepared for any situation.  Our passionate and professional staff includes current and former emergency response personnel, including nurses, EMT technicians, firefighters and more.

To learn about our individual class offerings, or to schedule your group for essential instruction, please call us at (888) 277-3143.

Thank you for reading the SureFire CPR blog!

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